Magnetic Resonance Imaging

 

What is an MRI? MRI (Magnet Resonance Imaging) is a detailed diagnostic tool used to help physicians evaluate different types of tissue, as well as distinguishing normal, healthy tissue from diseased tissue

Are there any harmful side effects from MRI? MRI does not use X-ray radiation to obtain images. MRI uses a strong magnetic field and radio waves.

What happens during an MRI exam? You will be positioned on the MRI table, typically lying on your back (this depends on the specific body part being scanned). Coils (special devices that act as antennas) will be placed on or around the area being imaged. It is important to remain motionless during the exam in order to get the highest quality images. During the scan, you may feel warmth in the specific area being examined… You will also hear a knocking sound during the exam. We will provide you with earplugs or a headset, (depending on the specific exam) for your hearing protection.

Is there anything that would prevent me from having an MRI exam? Because MRI uses a strong magnetic field, some implantable devices may prevent you from having an MRI. Your health and safety is very important to us, so we ask safety questions twice before your exam. Once on the phone and at the time of your exam. Please let your physician & technologist know if you have any implants or may be pregnant.

Is there any preparation for an MRI exam? You may eat, drink and take your medication as usual unless you are advised differently by our Radiology staff.

When and how will I get the results of my exam? An interpreted report by a specialist will be sent to your physician. Your physician will contact you in the normal way they usually contact you with test results. Please let the technologist know of where your last MRI was performed, this can help assist them in finding any previous studies if needed.

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